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Media Release

Date: 23 November 2017

National cancer charity award for RUH nurse

Congratulations to RUH haematology nurse specialist Theresa Peters, who's been recognised as a 'Beacon of Hope' by the Lymphoma Association for her dedication to supporting people affected by lymphoma, the UK's fifth most common cancer.

Theresa, who was nominated by a patient, launched a support group for lymphoma patients and their families/carers, running the group herself after work hours. She received her Beacons of Hope Award from the national cancer charity at a ceremony that took place in Birmingham.

BBC Radio 4 presenter Susan Rae hosted the awards ceremony and read out an extract of Theresa's nomination, which included:

"Until nearly two years ago, Theresa was the only nurse specialist for haematology at the hospital, and I know she had wanted to start a support group for lymphoma but just didn't have the time as she had such a heavy workload.

"Approximately 18 months later, another specialist nurse was appointed, giving Theresa time to dedicate to starting a group.

"We have now had several meetings and the patient group is growing steadily.Theresa not only organises the group, she makes sure there is always an appropriate speaker on each occasion.

This is all on top of her day job.

"She is my nurse specialist and always makes time for her patients with care and consideration. I believe she deserves this award."

Jonathan Pearce, chief executive of the Lymphoma Association, said: "We were delighted to be able to present Theresa with a Beacons of Hope Award.

"We provide specialist medical information and support to anyone affected by lymphoma, and the Beacons of Hope Awards are a chance for us to say thank you and to celebrate the achievements of people like Theresa who are making a real difference to people living with a lymphoma or blood cancer diagnosis."

Theresa said: "It's a great honour to be recognised by the Association, particularly as the nomination came from a patient. I'm so pleased that our support meetings are helping people to support each other, build a rapport and share and learn from their own personal experience.

"People are living much longer with and beyond cancer. Our support group is all about aftercare, people offering advice, reassurance and encouragement to each other. It's very informal and friendly – and vital for people to support each other."

Around 125,000 people are currently living with lymphoma. It is also the UK's fifth most common cancer and the most common cancer in under 30s.

To find out more about lymphoma, please call Freephone 0808 808 5555 or visit www.lymphomas.org.uk

ENDS

Notes to Editor:

  • The Royal United Hospitals Bath NHS Foundation Trust provides acute treatment and care for a catchment population of around 500,000 people in Bath, and the surrounding towns and villages in North East Somerset and Western Wiltshire. The hospital provides healthcare to the population served by four Clinical Commissioning Groups: Bath & North East Somerset CCG, Wiltshire CCG, Somerset CCG and South Gloucestershire CCG.
  • The Trust provides 565 beds and a comprehensive range of acute services including medicine and surgery, services for women and children, accident and emergency services, and diagnostic and clinical support services.
  • In 2015 The Royal United Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust was acquired the Royal National Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases (RNHRD) NHS Foundation Trust. The RNHRD treats patients from across the country offering services in rheumatology, chronic pain and chronic fatigue syndrome/ME.
  • The RUH is changing - we have an exciting programme of redevelopment underway transforming our site and further improving the services we provide. The Trust is now working towards building a purpose built RNHRD and Therapies Centre and a new Dyson Cancer Centre. For more details visit: www.ruh.nhs.uk/fit4future

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