Spontaneous wriggling or writhing movements which can occur when the medicine is working (i.e. the patient is 'on').
A rhythmic, oscillating movement, most commonly of the hands and or limbs.
When the patient is adequately treated and movements are reasonably fluent and spontaneous.
When when the patient's medication has worn off and movements are slow, deliberate and difficult. Other less visible symptoms of pain and distress may be a feature for some patients.
A noticeable transition from 'on' to 'off' occurring between doses of medication.
An umbrella term for the motor complications of more 'brittle' advanced disease. Patients can fluctuate from 'off', to 'on' and "on with dyskinesia." The change may be gradual or a sudden switch.

For Clinicians

Parkinson's Disease


Welcome to the RUH Parkinson's Disease (PD) Website

"Parkinson's Disease is often not what brings patients in to hospital, but it can be what keeps them in if we don't get their care right."
We estimate that around 900 people with PD live within the catchment area of the Royal United Hospital and so most clinical staff will be looking after people with PD from time to time, whatever their specialty.

Here we have put together information, reminders and guidance aimed at supporting best clinical care and avoiding common pitfalls.

Current research

Research into Parkinson's Disease is improving our understanding and care of the condition all the time. These bulletins, put together by the Jason Ovens, Library & Knowledge Service Manager at the RUH, give a summary of recent work from the world's journals.

December 2017

October 2017

September 2017

August 2017

July 2017

June 2017

May 2017

January 2017

November 2016

October 2016

September 2016

August 2016

May 2016

March 2016

February 2016

January 2016

October 2015

August 2015

June 2015

February 2015

December 2014

October 2014

August 2014

June 2014

February 2014

October 2013

June 2013

April 2013

February 2013

December 2012

October 2012

September 2012

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